Indicative Descriptors (Planning)

The indicative descriptors can help VET providers to consider their approach to quality assurance and gauge how much progress has been made. The following analysis presents two contrasting statements for each descriptor. You are invited to consider which of these statements best describes your own approach. By considering each contrasting statement, you can review your own progress towards a European system of quality assurance.

European, national and regional VET policy goals/objectives are reflected in the local targets set by the VET providers

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. VET provision takes account of European, national and regional goals or objectives
or
2. the goals and objectives of the VET provider are not connected to the European, national and regional VET policyIf you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:
- Austria: Supporting transition to VET
- Austria: Challenging gender stereotypes
- Estonia: A five year development plan
- Slovenia: A focus on employability
- United Kingdom: Developing company based training

Explicit goals/objectives and targets are set and monitored

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. there is clarity in relation to how goals or objectives are set and monitored
or
2. it is not clear how the organisation’s objectives or goals are set and monitored

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Austria: Supporting transition to VET
- Estonia: A five year development plan
Estonia: Creating a clear line of sight between strategic and personal objectives
- Germany: Developing high quality apprentices
- Ireland: Work-based apprenticeship training
- Ireland: Self-assessment
- Italy: Changing an organisation’s culture

Ongoing consultation with relevant stakeholders takes place to identify specific local/ individual needs

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. VET provision is based on local / individual  needs following consultation with stakeholders
or
2. little consultation takes place to identify the needs or priorities of stakeholders

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Austria: Supporting transition to VET
- Cyprus: Staff training
- Czech: Involving internal and external stakeholders
- Hungary: Using feedback from partners to improve VET
- Ireland: Self-assessment
- Italy: Standardising internal processes
- Slovenia: A central committee for quality assurance
- United Kingdom: Developing company based training
- United Kingdom: Encouraging disadvantaged groups

Responsibilities in quality management and development have been explicitly allocated

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. responsibility for each aspect of quality management and development is clear
or
2. there is little clarity over who has responsibility for quality management and development

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Czech: Using all four stages of the quality cycle
Estonia: A five year development plan
- Estonia: Creating a clear line of sight between strategic and personal objectives
- Finland: Supporting individual students
- Germany: Developing high quality apprentices
- Italy: Standardising internal processes
- Romania: Implementing the national model
- Slovenia: A central committee for quality assurance
- Spain: Peer support
- The Netherlands – Peer support
- United Kingdom: Developing company based training
- United Kingdom: Encouraging disadvantaged groups

There is an early involvement of staff in planning, including with regard to quality development

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. staff are involved early in planning all aspects of provision
or
2. staff are informed of planning decisions

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Austria: Challenging gender stereotypes
- Estonia: Creating a clear line of sight between strategic and personal objectives
- Slovenia: A central committee for quality assurance
- Slovenia: A focus on employability
- The Netherlands – Peer support

Providers plan cooperative initiatives with other VET providers

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. VET providers work with other VET providers to plan their activities
or
2. VET providers do not plan cooperative activities

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Germany: Inter-company training
- Slovenia: A focus on employability
- Spain: Peer support
- The Netherlands – Peer support

The relevant stakeholders participate in the process of analysing local needs

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. the voice of stakeholders is very important in identifying what VET is needed
or
2. stakeholders are just informed about what VET provision is available

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Cyprus: Staff training
- Slovenia: A focus on employability

VET providers have an explicit and transparent quality assurance system in place

Would you describe your approach to quality assurance as one where:
1. all stakeholders know and understand the VET provider’s quality assurance system
or
2. few individuals are aware of the VET provider’s quality assurance system

If you would like to see how other VET providers have addressed this issue, you can review the case studies:

- Austria: Supporting transition to VET
- Austria: Challenging gender stereotypes
- Finland: Using data and feedback to improve VET
- Finland: Supporting individual students
- Germany: Developing high quality apprentices
Italy: Changing an organisation’s culture
- Italy: Standardising internal processes
- Romania: Implementing the national model
- Slovenia: A central committee for quality assurance
- Spain: Peer support
- United Kingdom: Developing company based training

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